Ever wondered what you can do to preserve and display your keepsakes? From baby shoes, to the home-run baseball from little league, any of your treasured items can be turned into a unique display item for your home. We can even frame musical instruments and wedding treasures! With our acrylic materials and preservation techniques, we can turn your hidden keepsakes into perfectly preserved and protected works of art for your home. You saved it for a reason – let us help you protect and preserve your keepsakes!


So many fantastic framed pieces, where to display them?

With today’s customized and eclectic styles, just about anything goes! Stand groups of frames on an entryway table or on a fireplace mantle for a casual but deliberate look. Display one large piece or multiple pieces displayed in unique patterns down a staircase, or in a hallway.

Of course, you can always go the traditional route of hanging a framed picture or mirror on a wall, but don’t forget about the many ways to display even that! Long gone are the traditional displays of one piece over your mantel or couch.

Remember to unify your look with some element of commonness: a single color family in the art itself, or a consistently colored or styled frame. Let your personal style shine through!


May Color of the Month: Bud Green 

Welcome to May! The Color of the Month is Bud Green (Pantone 15-6442). Granny Smith apples, shamrocks, limes and emeralds all lend themselves to this month’s feature color. Green is the color of stability and healing; it’s representative of spring and the resurgence of color in nature. Because of its solidity, it can be a stunning anchor color in a room or provide opportunities for contrast and vibrancy (think Tangerine Tango for bold, Delphinium Blue for something more subdued). Don’t be afraid to take a chance on a memorable color this summer – Go Green!


Artist of the Month: Mark Pulliam

Mark Pulliam was born in 1959 in Cocoa, Florida. In 1983 he earned his BFA from the University of Florida. At the age of 22, he opened his first gallery. He quickly gained acclaimed in the Central Florida area, winning a number of awards at art shows and exhibiting his work in local galleries.

Today, almost twenty years later, Pulliam’s work can be seen all over the world. He consults with some of the top designers and architectural firms in the country. He and his wife reside in Winter Garden, Florida.

Says the artist, “I believe that surrendering to my instincts and letting my imagination and talent work the canvas provide ongoing education to my self-awareness. I feel that all great artists must go through this process. My earlier images were dependent on detailed, realistic interpretations. Later in my career I became less satisfied with technical depiction and began to focus on the other elements of painting. I began moving toward patterns, color and texture. My need to simplify became the dominant point of my expression, a process that I find tremendously gratifying.”


How to Properly Hang Your Art

First, select the proper hardware for your art. Whether it’s a heavy framed mirror or an unframed canvas, be sure you have the correct hardware to safely support and secure your art. Also note the type of surface it will attach to (drywall, stucco, plaster, paneling, etc.).Consider these hardware options:

  • Picture Hook
  • Plastic Anchor
  • Toggle Bolt
  • Mirror Hangers

Ask the framing professionals at Deck The Walls for the best method best for your art and wall type.

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Second, determine the appropriate height. Here’s a simple formula used by most professionals when hanging art:

  • Measure up 60” from the floor
  • To this, add half the height of the framed picture
  • Subtract the distance between the top of the frame and the hanger or top of the wire

That’s the ideal spot for your picture hanger. If the art will typically be viewed from a seated position or if it is being hung over a low piece of furniture, the art can be hung slightly lower.

Finally, level it out. Use a carpenter’s level to make sure your art is hanging level on your wall. If you don’t have a level, hold a half-full glass of water along the top of the frame. 


Spring Framing Trends

Looking for a flash of spring decorating inspiration? Hit the jackpot with GOLD!

Gold, bronze and brass colors in the home are experiencing a resurgence in 2013. With so many designers looking to the 1970s, it’s inevitable that brass and bronze will show up more – from accessories to cocktail tables, to wall coverings and picture frames. Gold and brass are the hot colors of the moment.

Practically considered a neutral color, this trend can be seen on art of all styles. From heavy gold lame’ frames, to distressed and weathered textures, nearly any piece of art framed in gold will complement and unify a room. Try a thin, bright gold frame with a striking complementary mat, or a thick, bold gold frame to bring out the warm colors in your home’s art.


Artist of the Week: T.L. Lange


April Color of the Month: Cayenne

Happy April! Our Color of the Month is Cayenne! (Pantone 18-1651). This color is Fiery, Energetic and Courageous. Try this color on your front door, on a window sill or a new set of plates to jazz up your home. Feeling extra bold? How about some Cayenne nail polish or lipstick? Embrace the heat!


Framing Keepsakes

Keepsakes become part of your home and history when you frame and display them. By displaying photos and items together, you tell a unique story that comes to life. Incorporate mats, dimensional frames and accessories into your framing to make it one-of-a-kind. Your keepsakes are protected and preserved while telling a story and keeping memories alive.


Caring For Your Framed Art
For Frames, use a feather duster or a very soft, clean cloth to keep your frames free of dust. Avoid any cleaning products and abrasive towels that may scratch the frame. If something splatters onto a frame, remove it immediately with a soft, barely damp rag. Try not to handle gilded frames unless you are wearing gloves as oil in the skin can leave spots that may discolor with time.
Regarding the glass on your framed pieces, in general, simply leave the framed piece alone with the exception of periodic cleaning. Feather dusting helps remove dust particles that may land on the glass. You can also use a soft lint-free cloth or newsprint and glass cleaner. Never spray the cleaner on the glass. Instead spray onto the rag and then wipe the glass.
Closely inspect the glass on a regular basis to see if it appears clear on the inside too. Various chemicals in dyes and inks used to make prints and mats can potentially off-gas. This may result in a cloudy residue on the inside of the glass. You can take the piece to your local framer to have it opened up, cleaned and placed pack in the frame.
Proper care and cleaning of your precious framed items will ensure their beauty and longevity.

Caring For Your Framed Art

For Frames, use a feather duster or a very soft, clean cloth to keep your frames free of dust. Avoid any cleaning products and abrasive towels that may scratch the frame. If something splatters onto a frame, remove it immediately with a soft, barely damp rag. Try not to handle gilded frames unless you are wearing gloves as oil in the skin can leave spots that may discolor with time.

Regarding the glass on your framed pieces, in general, simply leave the framed piece alone with the exception of periodic cleaning. Feather dusting helps remove dust particles that may land on the glass. You can also use a soft lint-free cloth or newsprint and glass cleaner. Never spray the cleaner on the glass. Instead spray onto the rag and then wipe the glass.

Closely inspect the glass on a regular basis to see if it appears clear on the inside too. Various chemicals in dyes and inks used to make prints and mats can potentially off-gas. This may result in a cloudy residue on the inside of the glass. You can take the piece to your local framer to have it opened up, cleaned and placed pack in the frame.

Proper care and cleaning of your precious framed items will ensure their beauty and longevity.